Doing well by doing good

and what we do


Bio-inspired innovation

Biomimicry is the art and science of studying the natural world, translating nature’s time-tested, life-friendly strategies & principles and applying these to human design and organisational challenges. Nature has billions of years of experience of what works and what doesn’t in a resource-constrained environment. Organisms are quite inventive engineers that harvest energy, filter water, ventilate, give colour without paint, regulate complex systems, build adaptive & resilient ecosystems etc. And they do this without negative side effects such as pollution and waste. What is more, systems in nature enhance the environment instead of degrading it while compounding value from generation to generation. Be inspired by nature’s solutions on how to design sustainable products, processes and systems.

Bio-inspired organisational development

The networked way of nature is incredibly creative despite obstacles and some of nature’s cooperatives have been around for millions of years – unlocking untapped value and creating more each generation. The secret for success lies in growing collaboration in flat, bottom up networks that sense and respond to real-time conditions which is far from the control & demand management style in our organisations. From cells to tissues and organs, from beehives to schools of fish to cities, cooperation is the architect of evolution. Symbiosis is both potent and infinite and there is lots our human societies can learn from these patterns in nature. “The ants aren’t choking on smug or stuck in traffic and the fungi aren’t counting carbon credits or worrying about the Pacific Garbage Patch. Termites don’t have slums. All have grown and prospered for hundreds of millions of years, through all kinds of radical change – and they have the same biomass we do, or more, and work in teeming cities of tens of millions of individuals, making more with each generation, and enriching the landscapes around them – there is no reason we can’t do it as well.” (Tamsin Woolley-Barker, 2017). Join us to explore and discover the deep organisational patterns and principles in nature that are the cornerstones for being responsive, adaptive, resilient and flourishing and learn how to apply these to your organisation.

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Bio-inspired organisational development

The networked way of nature is incredibly creative despite obstacles and some of nature’s cooperatives have been around for millions of years – unlocking untapped value and creating more each generation. The secret for success lies in growing collaboration in flat, bottom up networks that sense and respond to real-time conditions which is far from the control & demand management style in our organisations. From cells to tissues and organs, from beehives to schools of fish to cities, cooperation is the architect of evolution. Symbiosis is both potent and infinite and there is lots our human societies can learn from these patterns in nature. “The ants aren’t choking on smug or stuck in traffic and the fungi aren’t counting carbon credits or worrying about the Pacific Garbage Patch. Termites don’t have slums. All have grown and prospered for hundreds of millions of years, through all kinds of radical change – and they have the same biomass we do, or more, and work in teeming cities of tens of millions of individuals, making more with each generation, and enriching the landscapes around them – there is no reason we can’t do it as well.” (Tamsin Woolley-Barker, 2017). Join us to explore and discover the deep organisational patterns and principles in nature that are the cornerstones for being responsive, adaptive, resilient and flourishing and learn how to apply these to your organisation.

Regeneration – developing life enhancing solutions

Our present way of doing business cannot be sustained over the long haul. It exploites value, thereby eroding our life support system and decreasing wealth for the generations to come. In contrast, in nature, business is conducted via regenerative value, making more wealth for future descendants. Together, trees and fungi for example feed an entire ecosystem of organisms, sequester carbon, produce oxygen and regulate the climate. These systems thus not only create local value, they spill value into the wider ecosystem. There is no reason we cannot do this as well: designing buildings, gardens, landscapes and cities that can self-heal, feed the life that feeds them and generate value for the larger ecosystem. This is more than wishful thinking. Many people, projects, initiatives, businesses and governments are already doing this. Ever heard of forest gardens, permaculture farms, restorative agriculture, regenerative development, biophilic design, a factory like a forest, cities producing ecosystem services? Be inspired by examples in thinking and doing of life enhancing solutions and co-reflect on how to shift from exploitative to regenerative value creation. In the end, no business can sustain itself in a failing world.

Transition science – science for fundamental change management

Transition science is a new research field that studies patterns of human evolution and more specifically the interplay between humans and systems. Transition science looks for the leverage points for system change. The persistent problems we are facing today cannot be resolved with innovation-as-usual (eco-efficiency pathways) nor with traditional change management approaches (incremental change). What is needed is genuine system transformation – rethinking the way we organise our societies, our systems and our value systems. Even though transitions can not be managed in the old fashioned way of control and demand, they can be anticipated, influenced (giving direction) and accelerated. There are no ready-made solutions or blue prints. The key is to search, explore, rethink, unlearn, experiment, integrate, discover and invent alternative solutions. This is messy and chaotic. However, to break new ground, one has to leave the beaten track. Transition science brings together multiple approaches, such as systems thinking, foresight, social innovation and disruptive experimentation, in a powerful and structured way. Be inspired by transformative innovation – after all, new practices require new ways of thinking!

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